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Happy Semeet Baker - Old Town Alexandria Egypt by S@ilor on Flickr.Via Flickr:
Happy Baker in Old Town Alexandria Egypt. I never got to taste the bred, but it look very interesting. 
Semeet
The semeet vendor arranges his soft or hard semeet loaves (round, with a hole in the middle, like a large doughnut) round his wicker basket, and offers with the semeet a mixture of cumin and salt called do’aa wrapped in a paper, and a boiled egg for those who wish it. It is a cheap and filling meal, but is no longer as readily available as it was. Nevertheless, the combination of “semeet and do’aa” survives in the Egyptian language with the same meaning as “bread and salt” (aish wa malh), for is not semeet a variety on bread, and do’aa on salt? Both express the meaning that our friendship is too strong to be threatened by hard times. The expression is also similar to the English “we have broken bread together” and therefore cemented the relationship.
The most famous semeet vendor was the one parked on Rue Tewfik in town, outside Hannaux Pour Hommes annex.

Happy Semeet Baker - Old Town Alexandria Egypt by S@ilor on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
Happy Baker in Old Town Alexandria Egypt. I never got to taste the bred, but it look very interesting.

Semeet

The semeet vendor arranges his soft or hard semeet loaves (round, with a hole in the middle, like a large doughnut) round his wicker basket, and offers with the semeet a mixture of cumin and salt called do’aa wrapped in a paper, and a boiled egg for those who wish it. It is a cheap and filling meal, but is no longer as readily available as it was. Nevertheless, the combination of “semeet and do’aa” survives in the Egyptian language with the same meaning as “bread and salt” (aish wa malh), for is not semeet a variety on bread, and do’aa on salt? Both express the meaning that our friendship is too strong to be threatened by hard times. The expression is also similar to the English “we have broken bread together” and therefore cemented the relationship.

The most famous semeet vendor was the one parked on Rue Tewfik in town, outside Hannaux Pour Hommes annex.



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    Simit/Semeet: Can also be found in Turkey, Greece, Bulgaria - a cross cultural bread form.
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